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Non-availability of schools in or near the village is a primary reason for girls being away from their education. If schools are at a distance, families often force the girl child to leave education due to safety issues of travelling the long distance. Non-availability of public transport to the school is also seen as a hazard for the girls, forcing them to quit education.
Even the absence of simple facilities like boundry walls in schools and teachers stands in the way of a girl child’s education.

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Exclusion on the basis of gender is one of the biggest barriers in universalizing elementary education. In general, at the national level, the number of girls enrolled in school is lesser than the boys. School drop-out rate amongst adolescent girls remains particularly high at 63.5%.
Girls are also considered more vulnerable to abuse and exploitation, and are often not allowed to go to school because of this reason. Girls are often the first to be taken off schooling and put into household chores – like taking care of siblings, cleaning and cooking for the family. The sex ration of Girl:Boy in India in 2011 was 914:1000.

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a. Only 18% schools in India have separate toilets for girls.
b. 11% schools don’t have toilets at all
c. 34% schools, the toilets were completely unusable or in a very bad conditions
Not having separate or functioning toilets in school results in the lack of privacy and security for the girl. It is one of the key reasons why girls are forced to drop out of school.

Source: Study conducted by CRY on the 3rd anniversary of the RTE in India

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There are more than 5 million child labourers in India*. Irrespective of the data source, roughly 50% of all working girl child are girls.
19% of girl child employed work as domestic help and 90% working girl child are in rural India.**

Source: *National Sample Survey Organisation-66th Round 2009-10
** 7th All India Education Survey (2002)

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Early marriages are associated with a number of health problems amongst adolescent girls. Most importantly, early pregnancy, which not only leads to a high risk of abortion but also causes severe health damage to the adolescent girls.
• 44.5% of girls aged between 20 -14 years at the time of the survey were married before the age of 18.
• One in every six women (~16%) aged 16 -19 years had begun child bearing. 12% had already become mothers and 4% were pregnant with their first child at the time of the survey.

Source: Status of girl child in India: An overview of the past decade (a study commissioned by CRY in 2013)

When you support the Stay in School girl child education campaign, you help us:

Support for girl child
Ensure girls are enrolled in school
Support for girl child
Stop girls from dropping out of school
Support for girl child
Protect girls and keep them in school
Support for girl child
Improve infrastructure in schools so that girl child do not drop out
Support Girl Child
Yes I'd like to help! (Fill in an amount of your choice)
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Thank you for Your Donation:
RAMESH PARMAR, VISHNU PILLI, SIRISH KASARABADA, AMMINI ABRAHAM, THARACAD RAMANARAYANAN, KUNAL SHARMA, SATISH GANDHAM, RAJESH CHUGANI, PRIYANKA RONANKI, PRITI PATHAK, SRIDHAR REDDY KAYATHI, SREENIVASA GANTA, SRUJAN REDDY BADDAM, YOGESH VERMA, SURESH MUKNAHALLIPATNA, Chirra Reddy, Manoranjan Sahoo, Om Jindal, Rajveer Tut, Ravinderpaul Tut, Jagjit Tut, Bikram Singh, Vikrant Bhatnagar, Palak Bhatnagar, Anju Bhatnagar, Kabir Ahluwalia, Raaj Rahhi, Neelam Batish, Sonia Gupta, Silky Manwani, Ansh Batra, giniya gupta, Kapil Mehta, Ramakrishna Mantripragada, Bahar Pattarkine, Amit Gupta, Akilahmed Dahya, Vighnesh Das, Mahesh Rathi, Rajni Patel, SANMATI KAMATH, SAURABH KULKARNI, Rahul, Sashidhar, Akbar Doctor, Shubhi Jain, Gaurav, Swati, Sameer, Veerabhadrarao, Roy Rajan, Shobha, Vijaya, Narinder Kumar, Anjali Gupta, TARUN SETHI, PUJA SHARMA, PRASHANTH RADHAKRISHNAN, HARI PREKKE, AARAV NAIR, ARUN RAMACHANDRAN, RAJNI PATEL, HEMLATA DIXIT, AARAV NAIR, UMASHANKAR MANCHINENI, SANDEEP KAMATH, ASHISH KOUL, MOLEE CHAKRABORTY, GITIKA JAIN, VEERA IRUKU, SHUBHI JAIN, SHOBHA GURBANI, NAGESH KOTHURI, NIRANJAN DUVVURU, KATHY CLEWELL, NEERAJ KUMAR, APARNA BALAKRISHNAN, Namratha Hegde, Annika S, Samyutha Karthikeyan, Sreedha Ruttala, Srikkanth Srinivasaragavan, Ramesh Kakula, Sonali Karnik, Sanjay Bhujbal, Pranay Karmakar, Hunny Verma, ASHWANI TIKOO, BAOHUA WU, RIDHI LIKHI, SHAISHAV SINGH, Ashwin Sanal, Hemant Wamorkar
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How you make change: Stories of Hope

In Khaliapali village, Odisha, Sujata dropped out of school to work as a child laborer in order to contribute to the family income. With the help of Chale Chalo, a CRY America supported project, Sujata's parents were counselled on the importance of girls' education and were aided in creating additional savings by developing a kitchen garden which allowed Sujata to rejoin school. The consistent intervention by our project partner has given 17 other girls, like Sujata, the chance to go back to school and pursue a brighter future.



Rani Kale narrowly escaped being married off a week before her sixteenth birthday with the help of Sankalp Manav Vikas Sanstha (SMVS), a CRY America supported Project. Today Rani is not only continuing her education but also an active advocate of child rights and dreams of one day becoming an IAS officer. To date, Sankalp Manav Vikas has prevented 150 child marriages and because of it girl child like Rani have the chance to chase their dreams.

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Secure girls Future

An educated girl stays away from
early marriage, avoids exploitation at
work and becomes strong and independent
Stay away from Child Marriage
As she grows, she is able to make better choices for herself.
This transforms her persent life, gives her a secure future and helps her to look out for her family too.

Why should girls go to school?

When a girl is able to go to school, she sets off a cycle of positive change.

Educate girls to grow
Educated girls grow up to be empowered women and can influence the communities they live in, for good.
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  • Why girls drop out
  • Why girls should go to school
  • How you can help them finish
Early marriage:

In rural India, families live with modest means, and girls’ education is never a priority. Marriage is. And since marriage brings the burden of domestic work and rearing a family, several girls are forced to drop out of school.


Child labor:

Facing abject poverty parents often resort to sending their girls to work. Ending their hopes of finishing school. This makes them bound to labor, with no hope of ever being independent.


Discrimination:

Some families that can afford to send their girl child to school favour their sons over daughters, causing them to stay at home while their brothers attend school.


No toilets:

Lack of separate toilets for boys and girls is one of the leading causes for girls to drop out. The discomfort of sharing a toilet with their fellow classmates and teachers often compels them to give up on school altogether.


No schools near by:

For many girls, their reason for dropping out is simple. The village school is just too far. Parents, worried for their safety, prefer to have them stay at home than risk travelling the distance alone.

When a girl is able to go to school, she sets off a cycle of positive change. An educated girl stays away from early marriage, avoids exploitation at work and becomes strong and independent. As she grows, she is able to make better choices for herself. This transforms her present life, gives her a secure future and helps her to look out for her family too. Educated girls grow up to be empowered women and can influence the communities they live in, for good.

Your support to 'Stay in School', will ensure that 1071 girl child in India go to school, complete their education and realize their dreams. When you educate a girl you enable better choices for herself, her family and her community. Make sure she stays ahead just by staying in school.
$ 42
Ensure girls are enrolled in school
$75
Stop girls from dropping out of school
$110
Protect girls and keep them in school
$176
Improve infrastructure in schools, so that girls do not drop out
$
Yes I'd like to help! (Fill in an amount of your choice)